mediapathic

Sep 20

rdreamwalker:

asilookatthemoon:






The Quick Brown Fox Jumps Over the Lazy Dog.
I feel like I’ve been preparing for this image all my life.



The internet is over, everyone can go home

It’s just as beautiful as I always imagined.


My life is complete.

Life is over as we know it

rdreamwalker:

asilookatthemoon:

The Quick Brown Fox Jumps Over the Lazy Dog.

I feel like I’ve been preparing for this image all my life.

The internet is over, everyone can go home

It’s just as beautiful as I always imagined.

My life is complete.

Life is over as we know it

(Source: theamericankid, via hyperexaggeration)

Oh good, someone spotted warrenellis in his natural habitat.

Oh good, someone spotted warrenellis in his natural habitat.

(Source: machinegnome, via durtwytch)

Sep 17

Anonymous said: Shakespeare was queer? I thought he only had affairs with ladies. What dudes did he get it on with?

swanjolras:

OH U SWEET SUMMER CHILD

so remember those sonnets, you know, about one hundred and twenty-six of them, the whole thing about “shall i compare thee to a summer’s day”

written to a hot male earl, dude

in 1640 some asshole named john literally had to change all the pronouns in those 126 sonnets because they were super fuckin queer and he was not comfy with how super fuckin queer they were

also, like, casual elizabethan bisexuality? christopher “they who love not tobacco and boys are fools” marlowe? the venetian “tit bridge”, where prostitutes were commanded by official decree to stand around topless to entice men who were bangin’ too many dudes, because there were so many gay men it was becoming a legitimate social problem?

welcome to the wonderful world of “literally everyone in the past was queer”, friend, enjoy your stay

If you’re into this, the Coil album “The Angelic Conversation” is basically Dame Judi Dench reading a bunch of these super gay sonnets over ambient music. Super queer and super good.

salparadisewasright:

estufar:

An actual headline from The New York Times in 1919 


I love this so much.

salparadisewasright:

estufar:

An actual headline from The New York Times in 1919 

I love this so much.

(via theremina)

best-of-imgur:

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE let this not be a repost.http://best-of-imgur.tumblr.com

Yeah.

best-of-imgur:

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE let this not be a repost.
http://best-of-imgur.tumblr.com

Yeah.

Sep 12

http://spacetwinks.tumblr.com/post/97156425506/im-colin-spacetwinks-ive-been-struggling-with -

spacetwinks:

i’m colin spacetwinks. i’ve been struggling with depression for most of my life, as well as anxiety and a whole bunch of shit that comes with it. at 26 years old, i am finally in a place where i am winning far, far more of my battles with these things - and i want to make that clear, that it is a…

A very useful set of tools for anyone who deals with depression.

Sep 11

[video]

Sep 09

[video]

Sep 06

“Next to the "dragon" at the Old Town Hall the town’s second well-known emblem is displayed. This is a waggon wheel made from a tree found and felled fifty miles away from the city. According to the story, a local man waged to fell the tree, to make a wheel out of it, and to roll the wheel to the city of Brno, all this within a single day. Since the whole achievement was considered impossible by normal human means, the man was later believed to have called on the devil for assistance, and he died in poverty as a result.” — http://www.wikiwand.com/en/Brno#/Legends_connected_with_Brno

[video]

Sep 05

[video]

Sep 04

“Deleuzian analysis displays a realm of prodigious polymorphous coding in which desire restlessly invests across the boundaries; indeed, in which the libidinal cannot be confined to the narrower realm that bourgeois thought calls subjectivity or psychology (or even psychoanalysis), but shows how the social is also a tissue of phantasms, and the narrowly libidinal itself a web of social and political representations. This breaking down of the barriers between the subjective—narrow concepts of desire and libido, even of sexuality—and the allegedly objective—the social, the political, and the economic—is one of Deleuze’s most important achievements.” —

Fredric Jameson, Valences Of The Dialectic (via foucault-the-haters)

I’m always wondering, dadoodoflow, which of all of us is going to finally invent Deleuzian Chaos Magik. It’s literally right there waiting to materialize.

(via rufus666)

I’ve done a bit of work in this regard, mostly using the rhizomatic structure as a basis for visualization work, and some terrifying meditation based around Cyclonopedia, but since my specialty here is Whatever The Opposite of Academic Rigor is, this is probably more fruitful ground for others.

(via havesexwithghosts)

Sep 02

titancity:


YOUR WEAPONS CANNOT HARM ME

titancity:

YOUR WEAPONS CANNOT HARM ME

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via terribleminds)

Aug 31

And now, a dramatic interpretation of the last few minutes.

And now, a dramatic presentation of the last few minutes

"WOOO. FUCK YEAH! WE LOVE YOUR SHIT!"

"uh. Thanks guys. You know I’m the light guy, right?"

"YEAAAH! YOU FUCKIN ROCK!"

"and you realize that there is no one on this side of the club?"

"WOOOO"

"…because you had to go through that chain to get here?"

"FUCK YEAH"

"so… why don’t you go back over there where everyone else is?"

"WOOO FUCK YEAH! YOU THE MAN! KEEP IT UP" and they dance away

and, scene.

http://kushl0rd.tumblr.com/post/96207198558/dj-ghostatl-kushl0rd-my-history-of -

catvincent:

theheadlesshashasheen:

kushl0rd:

theheadlesshashasheen:

kushl0rd:

theheadlesshashasheen:

kushl0rd:

dj-ghostatl:

dj-ghostatl:

kushl0rd:

My History of Witchcraft teacher is just set on her knowledge that witchcraft and magick is utterly made up and entirely fabricated as a sociological phenomenon, with no basis in reality, and that there are no such things as true witches or real magick,

I’ve just never had much respect for academics that study anything magick-related for any culture but don’t practice it. How can they understand it with out doing it? There’s just so much that is missed, in my opinion, but that might be the tantric influences on thelema that I’m speaking from.

Join the club, my friend. Actually I’ve got very little respect for academic, the Occult aside. Like scientists, they’re incredibly afraid of what doesn’t fit into the schema of Western science, or at least what can’t be studied in a reasonably cut and dry fashion. They’re also incredibly dismissive of anything that may suggest otherwise—to the point of being malicious, condescending, intentionally ignorant, or socially exclusive of the perceived outlier. I ran into this problem when my paper was rejected from a philosophy conference because I had the gall to compare Heideggerian metaphysics with Thelema’s philosophy of Will. Not only was I the only major who submitted that was rejected from the conference, but the conference was both a philosophy and religious conference. 

Of course if they were less concerned with the map and more concerned with the territory we might have more Occultist-inclined teachers who are both factually correct and academically sound. But, you can’t go to a pauper expecting gold. And you can’t go to a muggle for any semblance of decency on a topic they believe is as dry and dead as the perception they’ve chosen for themselves. Not so much that a non-Occult narrative is worse than an Occultist one, but that the mere denial of pursual of the topic, or the failure to admit that one’s own method deserves critique from time and time again, especially when it continues to hold up a picture of the world as you’ve always known it to be true, is what makes their perception a failure.

The Occult doesn’t make a person perceptive—self-examination does. Academics however very rarely are honest with themselves, I find. It makes it easier for them to teach, when they cannot do.

I think the problem lies with fluid terms like witchcraft, or even magic. Given that the definitions of what is being done - or sought out, or feared - based on WHEN and WHERE in the world they are taking place, it’s easy to dismiss them as abstract psychological issues. And there is a certain amount of truth to such things -

Carlo Ginzburg begins his excellent Ecstasies: Deciphering the Witches’ Sabbath by establishing the fact that what became “witch fears” began as fear of immigrants/minorities (Jews), and plague victims (Lepers). A lot of accusations leveled at witches are precisely the same as those leveled earlier in history toward minorities or victims of circumstance. That doesn’t negate the rest of the book, of course, which increasingly leaps backwards into the past to establish that ecstatic cults (like the Benandanti) existed, or that folk practitioners of certain practices existed.

All of these things arose simultaneously, and fueled crazes. The problem is narrowing it all down into a single box and insisting that only one view can be applied. It just doesn’t work.

Of course. And I’m not denying that witchcraft accusations have to a certain extent been used to perpetuate a status quo by the big man—say at women or minorities—but to insist that is all of magick, that is the only history of magick there has ever been…

that’s just flat out wrong. To be more fair to the professor however the subject of the class is “the witch craze”, but the professor thus far has not gone to any lengths to discuss the philosophy of witchcraft, my certain groups practice witchcraft along with why they may have been falsely accused of doing so (say also as a defense against the Big Man, such as slaves practicing variants of hoodou and voodou against their white masters because no other way of fighting back was realistic) or that witchcraft itself is a broad term. 

There is something to be said about the psychology of witch-related things (and I follow a primarily psychological model of magick so I understand how relevant it is) but already the signs here don’t point to a course free of bumps in the road.

Right. It’s the “we have a box, so we’ll stuff everything in it” problem.

You certainly can’t understand Haitian Voodoo without understanding its origins; but most academics don’t have the internal capacity to write a book like Wade Davis (Passage into Darkness or The Serpent and the Rainbow). Instead they stick to what they feel are rational assessments of subjects that can’t be approached in an entirely rational manner.

So we end up with the “mental illness and mass psychology” explanations - “if you DID consider yourself a witch, it was because you were mentally ill, or if you believed in witches’ it was just being swept up into the madness of a craze.”

I don’t know if you caught it, but I passed on a link of a video from the BBC that was on henbane and witches a month or two ago. One of the academics - who had a distinctly “it never happened, because Patriarchy” mindset - insisted that entheogens were NEVER part of the witch trials and witch crazes. One of the individual given Henbane even had a pretty typical “flying ointment” style response to Henbane, and she still insisted there was no basis in history for it. Her arguments were FLAGRANTLY wrong. But she had a position staked already, and wouldn’t budge.

See but you’re just a plebeian than doesn’t know anything. She is the one with the true and honest keys to the city of wisdom, because she has a degree that you don’t have and that also makes her a better person than you

God, The Serpent in the Rainbow is one of my favorite books, how did you know :3

That’s okay. I’m a pragmatist. If her work is ever useful to me - which is doubtful - I’ll still steal it for my own, horrible ends. LOL.

And because The Serpent and the Rainbow is the shit!

The part of Serpent and the Rainbow that influences me to this day is the story of when Davis took the day off & went to see Raiders of the Lost Ark in Port-au-Prince.

At the end, when the angels came out of the Ark and started eating Nazis, the audience panicked - not a lot of experience with movies & they took the angels as real vengeful spirits coming out of the screen. Davis reported that as the panic started, a group of houngans spontaneously got up and assisted the terrified audience: one group threw spells at the screen to keep the creatures away while others got them to safely make it to the exits without crushing people underfoot.

Power of movies, guys. Power of magic.

(Source: pagesandplants)